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UK Local Councils

Great Casterton Parish Council

Serving the people of Great Casterton

Clerk: Derek Patience
29 Priory Gardens, Stamford, PE9 2EG

Tel: 01780 753066

The Church of St Peter & St Paul

St. Peter and St. Paul, Great Casterton is one of the five churches in the group comprising Great Casterton, Little Casterton, Pickworth, Tickencote and Tinwell.

PRIEST-IN-CHARGE The Rev. Jo Saunders 01780 480479 / 07946237223 Email revjosaunders@live.co.uk

HONORARY ASSISTANT PRIEST The Rev Bob Mackrill 01780 763788 / 0775365051 Email bobmackrill@btinternet.com

Our Sunday Service is at 10.30, and is Holy Communion on the 1st, 3rd and 4th Sunday. We have an informal Family Service on the 2nd Sunday. Visitors are always welcome, and we have a toy corner for small children.

Sunday School meets in the Hall on the 4th Sunday of the month in school term times. Parents and carers are welcome to stay with small children. The children join the congregation in church for the last part of the service.

Baptisms are held during the main Sunday service, but may also be arranged at other times.

Weddings by arrangement. Anyone living in, or with a connection to Great Casterton which includes Rutland Heights has the legal right to marry there. Please contact Rev Jo for further details and information.

We have a coffee morning in the hall every Wednesday in term time from 10.30 and warmly welcome visitors

Our Toddler Group meets in the hall every Friday in term time from 10.00 and we welcome all toddlers and their carers.

For details of Bible Study, House Group or Christian Faith courses please contact Rev Jo.

Gt. Casterton Church Hall is available for lettings. Contact Rev Jo 01780 480479 revjosaunders@live.co.uk

The Casterton Singers form the church choir, but also give concerts. New members are very welcome. Contact Jill Bush 01780 767270 or Marion Horobin 01780 755523

Large print copies of Service Sheets are available and we have excellent wheelchair access

Details of all services in the group can be found below.

Rev Jo's letter for December 2014

We duly celebrated a number of memorials in November – All Saints, All Souls and Remembrance; then on the 18th we held a service of thanksgiving at Little Casterton where we remembered Emily Francis, a long-term resident there before moving to Great Casterton and latterly to Chater Lodge. Emily was a stalwart of the Gt Casterton coffee morning, where her wisdom and humour were much appreciated.

While shops and TV advertisements exhort us to buy for Christmas (why is it so important to have a new sofa in time for Christmas?) the church tries to counteract this excess of consumerism by focussing on those who predicted and prepared for the coming of Christ; the Patriarchs, the Prophets, John the Baptist and Mary the mother of Jesus. Every Sunday in Advent sees us lighting a new candle until our Advent wreath blazes in glory with its central candle finally lit for the birth of the Christ-child.

I love Advent with its air of expectancy and quiet waiting. I've been re-reading Henri Nouwen, a Dutch priest who left his parish ministry to join L'Arche community in Canada. In these communities people with profound disabilities and able-bodied live together and learn from one another. Nouwen writes about waiting, pointing out that by its nature waiting involves the expectation that something will happen. So often we wait impatiently, and in so doing, miss the pleasure of what is happening as we wait. If we could learn to wait calmly we should be so much more at peace with ourselves.

Over the last few months I have been spending a day or two each month in a Franciscan hermitage, trying to learn to wait on God in silence. I find it hard; our minds are so busy with our everyday preoccupations that it's hard to let them go. People have asked me what I do there; they are incredulous when I say 'I wait in utter silence for God to speak.' We have so little real silence in our lives, and we need it if we are to hear his voice and learn his will for us.

But Christmas will not be a time of silent contemplation! I have spent most of this week (early November) planning our Christmas services, and here are the details of these plus another event:

Saturday December 6th: A concert of Georgian Carols in Gt Casterton church at 7.00. Tickets £6 to include refreshments. All proceeds to be shared between Evergreen and the church

Sunday 14th Christingle at Gt Casterton 10.30 Carol Service at Tinwell 4.30

Thursday 18th Carol Service for the Primary School in Gt Casterton church 6.30

Friday 19th Carol Service (by candlelight) at Pickworth 6.00

Sunday 21st Carol service at Gt Casterton 3.00 Carol Service (by candlelight) at Little Casterton 6.00

Monday 22nd Carol Service at Tickencote 7.00

Christmas Eve Crib Service at Gt Casterton 4.00 Midnight Mass at Gt Casterton 11.30pm

Christmas Day Holy Communion at Lt Casterton 9.00 Holy Communion at Tinwell 9.15 All Age Communion at Gt Casterton 10.30

Sunday 28th Benefice Service at Gt Casterton 10.30

Although I'm writing this on November 18th, well before Advent begins, I do, nevertheless, wish you a very happy, holy and peaceful Christmas.

With best wishes

Jo

OTHER SERVICES WITHIN THE GROUP

SUNDAY

9.00
(9.15 at TINWELL)

10.3O

OTHER

FIRST

HC TINWELL

HC LT CASTERTON

HC GT CASTERTON

SECOND

HC OR MP TICKENCOTE APRIL,MAY, JUNE JULY ONLY PLUS REMEMBRANCE AND CAROL SERVICE

FAMILY SERVICE
GT CASTERTON

TINWELL FAMILY SERVICE 4.00 from June 2014

THIRD

HC LT CASTERTON

HC GT CASTERTON

TINWELL EVENSONG 3.00 WINTER 4.00 SUMMER

FOURTH

HC PICKWORTH
HC TINWELL

HC GT CASTERTON AND SUNDAY SCHOOL

FIFTH

BENEFICE HC IN ONE OF OUR FIVE CHURCHES - SEE NOTICE BOARDS FOR DETAILS EACH TIME

The Parish Church stands in what in Roman times was a protected zone between the ramparts and ditch on the N.and E.and the river on the S. and W. The church stands on the site of a Roman temple, on which an early Christian church was built; this was probably a wooden structure, but of it no trace remains.

The wooden structure was replaced by a Saxon church consisting of a small Chancel and an archless Nave. Saxon long and short work is still in evidence in the S.E. corner of the nave.

The Norman church consisted of a nave and two small aisles divided from the Nave by round, arched arcades resting on columns of stone with square bases. The nave was low with a flat wooden roof. The tower opened into the nave through a fine horseshoe arch. At the E. end was a wall pierced with a low round arch leading into a small oblong chancel, against the East end of which was the altar.

In the 13th Century an Early English chancel with lancet windows was built, while the round arch between the nave and chancel was raised to a point. Other changes followed: the aisles were lighted with windows with decorated tracery, and carried on their walls in rough distemper the story of the Incarnation. Above the Norman arcade was added a clerestory with decorated windows surmounted by an open roof of massive oak timbers. Across the chancel arch stretched a wooden loft carrying figures of Our Lord on the Cross with St Mary and St John on either side.

In the 15th century a clerestory was added. The font on a chamfered plinth may be late 12th/early 13th century.

The Reformation saw the destruction of many of the church's treasures.

In the 18th century the church was fitted with box pews of deal.

Considerable restoration work was carried out in the mid to late 20th century.