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UK Local Councils

Great Casterton Parish Council

Serving the people of Great Casterton

Clerk: Derek Patience
29 Priory Gardens, Stamford, PE9 2EG

Tel: 01780 753066

The Church of St Peter & St Paul

St. Peter and St. Paul, Great Casterton is one of the five churches in the group comprising Great Casterton, Little Casterton, Pickworth, Tickencote and Tinwell.

PRIEST-IN-CHARGE The Rev. Jo Saunders 01780 480479 / 07946237223 Email revjosaunders@live.co.uk

HONORARY ASSISTANT PRIEST The Rev Bob Mackrill 01780 763788 / 0775365051 Email bobmackrill@btinternet.com

Our Sunday Service is at 10.30, and is Holy Communion on the 1st, 3rd and 4th Sunday. We have an informal Family Service on the 2nd Sunday. Visitors are always welcome, and we have a toy corner for small children.

Sunday School meets in the Hall on 1st and 4th Sunday in school term times. Parents and carers are welcome to stay with small children. The children join the congregation in church for the last part of the service.

Baptisms are held during the main Sunday service, but may also be arranged at other times.

Weddings by arrangement. Anyone living in, or with a connection to, Great Casterton which includes Rutland Heights has the legal right to marry there. Please contact Rev Jo for further details and information.

We have a coffee morning in the hall every Wednesday in term time from 10.30 and warmly welcome visitors

Our Toddler Group meets in the hall every Friday in term time from 10.00 and we welcome all toddlers and their carers.

For details of Bible Study, House Group or Christian Faith courses please contact Rev Jo.

Gt. Casterton Church Hall is available for lettings. Contact Steve Suffling 01780 751384

The Casterton Singers form the church choir, but also give concerts. New members are very welcome. Contact Jill Bush 01780 767270 or Marion Horobin 01780 755523

Large print copies of Service Sheets are available and we have excellent wheelchair access

Details of all services in the group can be found below.

REV JO'S LETTER FOR SEPTEMBER 2014

September sees the start of a new school term. We hold in our prayers the children beginning school for the first time (my younger grandson will be one of them) and those moving on to secondary school or higher education. It is a stressful time for parents and children as a whole new way of life begins, but it holds many wonderful challenges and experiences.

As the new school year begins, the agricultural cycle draws to an end as the last fields are combined. We celebrate God's bounty with Harvest services at Tickencote and Great Casterton on 14th, and Tinwell on October 5th. Details of Harvest lunches at Gt Casterton and Tinwell will appear shortly, and because these are always very popular, make sure you book your place in good time.

But for many there will be no harvest this year; in war-torn Syria, Iraq and Gaza, in Sudan and many other places the people have lost, or had to leave their homes and fields, and to become totally dependent on international aid for their food. Please remember them, especially the children, as you eat well and enjoy the fruits of the harvest, and pray for peace and reconciliation. Any child over six in Gaza will have experienced three conflicts in his or her lifetime and many have witnessed the violent death of a family member. Psychiatrists fear that this will have a lasting impact on the mental health of a whole generation.

On August 12th the funeral of Michael Hesketh was held at Marholm. Michael was a prison officer, and one of his colleagues spoke in his tribute of Michael's sense of humour and love of practical jokes. Michael's brother-in-law played the flute very movingly at the service. Our sympathies go to Sandra, Laura and Michael Jnr at this time.

On August 24th Darcie Mae Bate was baptised at Gt Casterton. Her parents, Emma and Sam, were married there last year, and we were delighted that they wished to return for the service.

On September 6th Antony Singer and Claire Lythgoe will be married at Gt Casterton, and their small son Harry will be baptised during the service. This service of marriage with baptism is relatively new in the Church of England, and is a lovely way of affirming publicly that they are a family asking God's blessing on their commitment to one another.

Another little boy, Charles Ragg, will be baptised at Tinwell on 21st. Charles' mum Jo (nee Cramp) grew up in Tinwell, and again it is such a pleasure to welcome them back to the village for the service.

Another unmissable September event is Little Casterton's vintage farm machinery weekend on 20/21 September. If you have never been to this, do come along this year. The sight and sound of steam engines ploughing, harrowing and winnowing is wonderfully evocative; the cakes in the tea tent are superb and the views over the countryside stunning. Children love it, adults love it, dogs love it – so do come along and indulge in a wonderful piece of nostalgia.

In July I wrote about plans to suspend the living of Gt Casterton, Lt. Casterton, Pickworth and Tickencote for another five years. Following consultation between the Bishop and all four churches, this has now taken place, though of course the living could be reinstated should the churches so wish (and should they be able to afford a full time priest!) I have agreed to renew my licence for another five years, which gives us and the diocese plenty of time to consider the future of the churches. What is important is that we should leave them in good heart for the next stage in their lives. Strengthening our knowledge of the Christian faith is a good way to work towards this, and so I encourage you to join Bob's Christian faith course, details for which are elsewhere in this issue.

And finally, a former parishioner sent me this:

A church was badly in need of a coat of paint, so the vicar decided he'd do the job himself. But all he had was one bucket of paint, so he thinned the paint enough to cover the entire church and spent all day painting. That night it rained very hard and washed all the paint off. The vicar was quite discouraged and asked God, 'Why...why God, did you let it rain and wash off all my hard work?'

To which God thundered his reply, 'Repaint! Repaint! And thin no more!'

With best wishes

Jo

OTHER SERVICES WITHIN THE GROUP

SUNDAY

9.00
(9.15 at TINWELL)

10.3O

OTHER

FIRST

HC TINWELL

HC LT CASTERTON

HC GT CASTERTON

SECOND

HC OR MP TICKENCOTE APRIL,MAY, JUNE JULY ONLY PLUS REMEMBRANCE AND CAROL SERVICE

FAMILY SERVICE
GT CASTERTON

TINWELL FAMILY SERVICE 4.00 from June 2014

THIRD

HC LT CASTERTON

HC GT CASTERTON

TINWELL EVENSONG 3.00 WINTER 4.00 SUMMER

FOURTH

HC PICKWORTH
HC TINWELL

HC GT CASTERTON AND SUNDAY SCHOOL

FIFTH

BENEFICE HC IN ONE OF OUR FIVE CHURCHES - SEE NOTICE BOARDS FOR DETAILS EACH TIME

The Parish Church stands in what in Roman times was a protected zone between the ramparts and ditch on the N.and E.and the river on the S. and W. The church stands on the site of a Roman temple, on which an early Christian church was built; this was probably a wooden structure, but of it no trace remains.

The wooden structure was replaced by a Saxon church consisting of a small Chancel and an archless Nave. Saxon long and short work is still in evidence in the S.E. corner of the nave.

The Norman church consisted of a nave and two small aisles divided from the Nave by round, arched arcades resting on columns of stone with square bases. The nave was low with a flat wooden roof. The tower opened into the nave through a fine horseshoe arch. At the E. end was a wall pierced with a low round arch leading into a small oblong chancel, against the East end of which was the altar.

In the 13th Century an Early English chancel with lancet windows was built, while the round arch between the nave and chancel was raised to a point. Other changes followed: the aisles were lighted with windows with decorated tracery, and carried on their walls in rough distemper the story of the Incarnation. Above the Norman arcade was added a clerestory with decorated windows surmounted by an open roof of massive oak timbers. Across the chancel arch stretched a wooden loft carrying figures of Our Lord on the Cross with St Mary and St John on either side.

In the 15th century a clerestory was added. The font on a chamfered plinth may be late 12th/early 13th century.

The Reformation saw the destruction of many of the church's treasures.

In the 18th century the church was fitted with box pews of deal.

Considerable restoration work was carried out in the mid to late 20th century.