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UK Local Councils

Great Casterton Parish Council

Serving the people of Great Casterton

Clerk: Derek Patience
29 Priory Gardens, Stamford, PE9 2EG

Tel: 01780 753066

The Church of St Peter & St Paul

St. Peter and St. Paul, Great Casterton is one of the five churches in the group comprising Great Casterton, Little Casterton, Pickworth, Tickencote and Tinwell


PRIEST-IN-CHARGE

The Rev. Jo Saunders 01780 480479 / 07946237223 Email revjosaunders@live.co.uk

HONORARY ASSISTANT PRIEST

The Rev Bob Mackrill 01780 763788 / 0775365051 Email bobmackrill@btinternet.com

READER

Mrs Rhona Tomlyn 01780 764462 Email rhonatomlyn@gmail.com

Our Sunday Service is at 10.30, and is Holy Communion on the 1st, 3rd and 4th Sunday. We have an informal Family Service on the 2nd Sunday. Visitors are always welcome, and we have a toy corner for small children. Baptisms are held during the main Sunday service, but may also be arranged at other times by arrangement. Anyone living in, or with a connection to Great Casterton which includes Rutland Heights has the legal right to marry there. Please contact Rev Jo for further details and information.

We have a coffee morning in the hall every Wednesday in term time from 10.30 and warmly welcome visitors

Our Toddler Group meets in the hall every Friday in term time from 10.00 and we welcome all toddlers and their carers.

For details of Bible Study, House Group or Christian Faith courses please contact Rev Jo.

Gt. Casterton Church Hall is available for lettings. Contact Steve Suffling 01572 869033 mobile 0752 8359511 Email chez1521@hotmail.com

The Casterton Singers form the church choir, but also give concerts. New members are very welcome. Contact Jill Bush 01780 767270 or Marion Horobin 01780 755523

Large print copies of Service Sheets are available and we have excellent wheelchair access

Details of all services in the group can be found below.

Rev Jo's letter for September 2015

Someone once remarked that Harvest is one of the most wonderful times of celebration in the church because nobody gets killed! At the time I was somewhat startled, but realised that immediately after Christmas comes the feast of the Holy Innocents, those children slain by Herod in his efforts to do away with Jesus; while Easter celebrates the resurrection, it comes only because of the events of Good Friday – and many of those saints we commemorate during the year met with extremely unpleasant deaths for their faith. So yes, harvest is in many ways a welcome relief from so much death and destruction.

As well as celebrating God's providence, however, we should consider the way we care for the world which has been entrusted to us. The earth is not ours to do what we want with. It is made by God and we are privileged to have a time here to look after and enjoy it. The expectation is that we will pass it on to our children in a better condition than we found it. How can we do this when huge swathes of the earth disappear under concrete to meet the ever-increasing demand for housing? How can we say we respect the earth while we watch thousands of acres of rainforest slashed and burnt every day to make way for palm oil crops – the very palm-oil that goes to make cosmetics, beauty products and soap, but which displaces tribes who have lived there for generations, as well as the native species which are now under threat of extinction. How should we respond to all this as Christian people?

Harvest is also about sharing. We have so much of the world's resources, whilst others lack even the most basic necessities. We turn on a tap and have clean water; in many parts of India and Africa women and children walk many miles each day to fetch water from rivers – water which often carries disease and pollutants which endanger children and babies. The UK should be ashamed that it is top of all European countries for food waste, with approximately a third of all food bought being thrown away.

Jesus told his disciples that they should abandon materialism; consider the lilies of the field, he said; they neither toil nor spin, yet Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like them. Stop worrying, stop accumulating and live – the Bread of Life, which we heard so much about in our readings from St John dover the summer, is all we need. In C21st Britain, the more we seek happiness through acquiring things the less happy we seem to be!

Of course we should enjoy our celebrations of harvest and thank God for them, but maybe this tear we could make a special effort to consider our priorities in life. We have read recently about our diary farmers, many forced out of business by the greed of the supermarkets which have hitherto refused to pay the producers anything like what it costs to produce milk. Thousands of them have been forced to give up dairying, often having to sell herds which have been bred of the farm for generations. The incidence of depression, stress-related illness and even suicide amongst the farming community is too dreadful to contemplate.

At Great Casterton it is our custom to make a generous donation every year from our Harvest service and lunch. This year it will go to the Farming Community Network (formerly the Farming Crisis Network), which does so much to support farmers in difficulty. Please support it generously to show your appreciation of our farmers, working long hard hours to bring us our food.

Some of our small churches are not in the habit of giving regularly to charity; perhaps they would consider a donation this year to a Harvest-related charity such as Water Aid, Oxfam, Send A Cow or, of course, the FCN I have mentioned above. As that lovely hymn, Beauty for Brokenness, puts it

God of the poor, friend of the weak,

give us compassion we pray:

melt our cold hearts, let tears fall like rain;

come, change our love from a spark to a flame

Details of our Harvest Services are as follows: Sept 13 9.00 Tickencote and 3.00 Pickworth Oct 4 10.30 Great Casterton and 10.30 Tinwell

With best wishes

Jo

OTHER SERVICES WITHIN THE GROUP

SUNDAY

9.00
(9.15 at TINWELL)

10.3O

OTHER

FIRST

HC TINWELL

HC LT CASTERTON

HC GT CASTERTON

SECOND

HC OR MP TICKENCOTE APRIL,MAY, JUNE JULY ONLY PLUS REMEMBRANCE AND CAROL SERVICE
MP TINWELL

FAMILY SERVICE
GT CASTERTON

THIRD

HC LT CASTERTON

HC GT CASTERTON

EVENSONG 3.00 WINTER 4.00 SUMMER TINWELL

FOURTH

HC or MP PICKWORTH
HC TINWELL

HC GT CASTERTON

FIFTH

BENEFICE HC IN ONE OF OUR FIVE CHURCHES - SEE NOTICE BOARDS FOR DETAILS EACH TIME

The Parish Church stands in what in Roman times was a protected zone between the ramparts and ditch on the N.and E.and the river on the S. and W. The church stands on the site of a Roman temple, on which an early Christian church was built; this was probably a wooden structure, but of it no trace remains.

The wooden structure was replaced by a Saxon church consisting of a small Chancel and an archless Nave. Saxon long and short work is still in evidence in the S.E. corner of the nave.

The Norman church consisted of a nave and two small aisles divided from the Nave by round, arched arcades resting on columns of stone with square bases. The nave was low with a flat wooden roof. The tower opened into the nave through a fine horseshoe arch. At the E. end was a wall pierced with a low round arch leading into a small oblong chancel, against the East end of which was the altar.

In the 13th Century an Early English chancel with lancet windows was built, while the round arch between the nave and chancel was raised to a point. Other changes followed: the aisles were lighted with windows with decorated tracery, and carried on their walls in rough distemper the story of the Incarnation. Above the Norman arcade was added a clerestory with decorated windows surmounted by an open roof of massive oak timbers. Across the chancel arch stretched a wooden loft carrying figures of Our Lord on the Cross with St Mary and St John on either side.

In the 15th century a clerestory was added. The font on a chamfered plinth may be late 12th/early 13th century.

The Reformation saw the destruction of many of the church's treasures.

In the 18th century the church was fitted with box pews of deal.

Considerable restoration work was carried out in the mid to late 20th century.