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UK Local Councils

Great Casterton Parish Council

Serving the people of Great Casterton

Clerk: Derek Patience
29 Priory Gardens, Stamford, PE9 2EG

Tel: 01780 753066

The Church of St Peter & St Paul

St. Peter and St. Paul, Great Casterton is one of the five churches in the group comprising Great Casterton, Little Casterton, Pickworth, Tickencote and Tinwell


PRIEST-IN-CHARGE

The Rev. Jo Saunders 01780 480479 / 07946237223 Email revjosaunders@live.co.uk

HONORARY ASSISTANT PRIEST

The Rev Bob Mackrill 01780 763788 / 0775365051 Email bobmackrill@btinternet.com

READER

Mrs Rhona Tomlyn 01780 764462 Email rhonatomlyn@gmail.com

Our Sunday Service is at 10.30, and is Holy Communion on the 1st, 3rd and 4th Sunday. We have an informal Family Service on the 2nd Sunday. Visitors are always welcome, and we have a toy corner for small children. Baptisms are held during the main Sunday service, but may also be arranged at other times by arrangement. Anyone living in, or with a connection to Great Casterton which includes Rutland Heights has the legal right to marry there. Please contact Rev Jo for further details and information.

We have a coffee morning in the hall every Wednesday in term time from 10.30 and warmly welcome visitors

Our Toddler Group meets in the hall every Friday in term time from 10.00 and we welcome all toddlers and their carers.

For details of Bible Study, House Group or Christian Faith courses please contact Rev Jo.

Gt. Casterton Church Hall is available for lettings. Contact Steve Suffling 01572 869033 mobile 0752 8359511 Email chez1521@hotmail.com

The Casterton Singers form the church choir, but also give concerts. New members are very welcome. Contact Jill Bush 01780 767270 or Marion Horobin 01780 755523

Large print copies of Service Sheets are available and we have excellent wheelchair access

Details of all services in the group can be found below.

PRAYERS FOR THIS WEEK

Monday: Lord, help me to love those I find it hard to love; to put myself in their place and understand them
Tuesday: Lord. You are the beginning and the end, the α and the θ. Help me to trust you in everything I do.

Wednesday: Lord, your apostle John said 'mourning and crying and pain will be no more, for the first things have passed away.' Help me to bring these words of comfort to those who mourn, or weep or who are in pain.

Thursday: Lord, you said 'See, I am making all things new.' When the world seems so full of hatred and violence, help us to remember this and to pray for its coming about.

Friday: Lord, Jesus said 'the Son of Man has been glorified, and God has been glorified in him.' may everything I do this week, no matter how trivial or insignificant be to your glory.

Saturday: Thank you for this week, Lord; for all that has happened in my life and for your love which continues to surround me.

Rev Jo's letter for MAY 2016

May begins with not only a bank Holiday but with Rogation Sunday, the last Sunday before Ascension Day, and which was, traditionally, a day on which the newly-sown crops were blessed and thanks were offered for those whose labour produced the harvest. Congregations would often 'beat the bounds'; they would process around the parish boundaries and pray for God's blessing on them. Choir-boys (which every parish would have had in those days) were stood on their heads to imprint knowledge of the parish boundaries!

I think the boundaries of our parishes would come as a surprise to many of us. Great Casterton, Little Casterton and Tinwell all include parts of Stamford. This causes some confusion amongst prospective wedding couples, who understandably think they are in one of the Stamford parishes approach the clergy there only to discover that they are actually in one of these parishes. Luckily there is a very helpful website 'What parish am I in?' where you enter your postcode and immediately discover which ecclesiastical parish you live in. In many ways the parochial system is very out-moded and needs to be re-thought.

On Monday 2nd the ashes of the late Stuart Hemphill will be interred at Little Casterton, followed by a memorial service. On Thursday 10th we celebrate Ascension Day with a Communion Service at Great Casterton at 10.00. I can't recall ever seeing worshippers from the other churches at this service, despite its being one of the most important days in the Church calendar. Perhaps this year will prove the exception…

A performance of Cell Talk takes place on 11th in Little Casterton church and promises to be a fascinating afternoon as a conversation takes place between two mediaeval anchorites (holy women who lived in their hermit cells away from the world,) Dame Margery Kempe and Julian of Norwich. Entrance is free but there will be a collection for Christian Aid. There will also be coffee and cake, thanks to Angela Harris.

A number of people have asked me about the cross in Great Casterton church, which has looked truly spectacular throughout the Easter season, thanks to Mary Sproson. The cross is formed from the church Christmas tree. Its needles have been removed, leaving the bare trunk, which John Horobin then formed into a cross. Throughout Lent it stood bare apart from a crown of thorns to remind us that Christmas and Easter are inextricably linked- the child born at Christmas became the man who died on the cross for our sins. Then at Easter that bare cross blossomed against the backdrop of Christ's purple robe, celebrating the risen Christ and new life that comes from our redemption. It is a very powerful symbol and has clearly made a considerable impression of many people.

Almighty God, Lord of heaven and earth: We humbly pray that your gracious providence may give and preserve to our use the harvests of the land and of the seas, and may prosper all who labour to gather them, that we, who are constantly receiving good things from your hand, may always give you thanks; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen (The collect for Rogation Day)

With best wishes

Jo

OTHER SERVICES WITHIN THE GROUP

SUNDAY

9.00
(9.15 at TINWELL)

10.3O

OTHER

FIRST

HC TINWELL

HC LT CASTERTON

HC GT CASTERTON

SECOND

HC OR MP TICKENCOTE APRIL,MAY, JUNE JULY ONLY PLUS CAROL SERVICE
MP TINWELL

FAMILY SERVICE
GT CASTERTON

THIRD

HC LT CASTERTON

HC GT CASTERTON

EVENSONG 3.00 WINTER 4.00 SUMMER TINWELL

FOURTH

HC or MP PICKWORTH
HC TINWELL

HC GT CASTERTON

FIFTH

BENEFICE HC IN ONE OF OUR FIVE CHURCHES - SEE NOTICE BOARDS OR p-IN-C's LETTER FOR DETAILS EACH TIME

The Parish Church stands in what in Roman times was a protected zone between the ramparts and ditch on the N.and E.and the river on the S. and W. The church stands on the site of a Roman temple, on which an early Christian church was built; this was probably a wooden structure, but of it no trace remains.

The wooden structure was replaced by a Saxon church consisting of a small Chancel and an archless Nave. Saxon long and short work is still in evidence in the S.E. corner of the nave.

The Norman church consisted of a nave and two small aisles divided from the Nave by round, arched arcades resting on columns of stone with square bases. The nave was low with a flat wooden roof. The tower opened into the nave through a fine horseshoe arch. At the E. end was a wall pierced with a low round arch leading into a small oblong chancel, against the East end of which was the altar.

In the 13th Century an Early English chancel with lancet windows was built, while the round arch between the nave and chancel was raised to a point. Other changes followed: the aisles were lighted with windows with decorated tracery, and carried on their walls in rough distemper the story of the Incarnation. Above the Norman arcade was added a clerestory with decorated windows surmounted by an open roof of massive oak timbers. Across the chancel arch stretched a wooden loft carrying figures of Our Lord on the Cross with St Mary and St John on either side.

In the 15th century a clerestory was added. The font on a chamfered plinth may be late 12th/early 13th century.

The Reformation saw the destruction of many of the church's treasures.

In the 18th century the church was fitted with box pews of deal.

Considerable restoration work was carried out in the mid to late 20th century.