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UK Local Councils

Great Casterton Parish Council

Serving the people of Great Casterton

Clerk: Derek Patience
29 Priory Gardens, Stamford, PE9 2EG

Tel: 01780 753066

The Church of St Peter & St Paul

St. Peter and St. Paul, Great Casterton is one of the five churches in the group comprising Great Casterton, Little Casterton, Pickworth, Tickencote and Tinwell.

PRIEST-IN-CHARGE The Rev. Jo Saunders 01780 480479 / 07946237223 Email revjosaunders@live.co.uk

HONORARY ASSISTANT PRIEST The Rev Bob Mackrill 01780 763788 / 0775365051 Email bobmackrill@btinternet.com

Our Sunday Service is at 10.30, and is Holy Communion on the 1st, 3rd and 4th Sunday Sunday School meets in the Hall on 4th Sunday). We have an informal Family Service on the 2nd Sunday. Visitors are always welcome, and we have a toy corner for small children.

Baptisms are held at this service, but may also be arranged at other times.

Weddings by arrangement.

Anyone living in, or with a connection to, Great Casterton which includes Rutland Heights has the legal right to marry there. Anyone living in, or with a connection to, the other churches has the right to marry there

We have a coffee morning in the hall every Wednesday in term time from 10.30 and warmly welcome visitors

Sunday School is held on the 4th Sunday of each month at 10.15 in the church hall for children up to the age of 11. Parents and carers are welcome to stay with small children. The children join the congregation in church for the last part of the service.

Our Toddler Group meets in the hall every Friday in term time from 10.00 and we welcome all toddlers and their carers

Gt. Casterton Church Hall is available for lettings. Contact Steve Suffling 01780 751384

The Casterton Singers form the church choir, but also give concerts. New members are very welcome. Contact Jill Bush 01780 767270 or Marion Horobin 01780 755523

Large print copies of Service Sheets are available and we have excellent wheelchair access

Details of all services in the group can be found below.

REV JO'S LETTER FOR JULY 2014

Over recent weeks we've been considering the way forward for these churches. A large number of you filled in questionnaires and returned them, and these have formed the basis of our discussion. It's important that we don't become complacent or locked into the 'cosy club' syndrome. Much as we may like our own church, the world around us moves on, and the church must either move with it or face decline. Rural churches are at greatest risk of decline and closure, and that was the main reason for initiating this review of what we do, what we fail to do, and what we'd like to do.

The final version will appear in all the churches as soon as it is finalised. It will look at the five marks of mission identified by the Church of England (proclaiming the Good News of the Kingdom , teaching, baptising and nurturing new believers , responding to human need by loving service , seeking to transform unjust structures of society, challenging violence of every kind and pursuing peace and reconciliation, and striving to safeguard the integrity of creation and sustain and renew the life of the earth) and attempt to assess how well (or how badly) we match up to them.

Obviously we can never please all the people all the time – some wanted more modern hymns, others more traditional hymns. Many would like to see pews removed so that worship could be more flexible, others were horrified at the prospect. But hymns and pews are peripheral to what we are about as a church, namely proclaiming the good news of Jesus Christ, and this must be our focus.

One thing a number of people requested was a midweek house group, and I am delighted to say that Adrian Mainstone has agreed to lead one at Great Casterton (but, of course, one that is open to people from all the churches.) Details will appear shortly. Please do support this; regular Bible study, worship and friendship are what grows a church, and helps us to grow spiritually.

PCC secretaries at Gt Casterton, Little Casterton, Tickencote and Pickworth will have received a letter from the Bishop regarding the suspension of the living, and inviting comments. When Philip Street retired as Rector the living was suspended i.e. I was appointed as Priest in Charge, not as Rector, to give the churches a time to consider their long-term future. That was five years ago, and the time has now come for the churches to decide whether they want another Rector i.e. a full-time resident priest, which would cost the parishes something in the region of £70,000, or whether they wish to suspend the living for a further period and continue with an unpaid and part-time Priest-in Charge. Tinwell is legally still part of the Ketton benefice, so not party to these discussions. Its future lies in any decisions regarding that benefice. (For those who are mystified by this, a priest-in-charge is in charge of a parish but does not receive the temporalities of that parish. He or she is not legally responsible for the churches and glebe, and simply holds a licence rather than the freehold . Priests in charge rather than incumbents (who do receive the temporalities) are usually appointed when parish reorganisation is taking place or to give the bishop greater control over the deployment of his clergy.)

I do hope that the four parishes concerned will discuss the future fully, and do so in the light of our mission plan. Whatever the future holds, it is vital that the churches are in good heart.

One of the things people liked most at Great Casterton was the music, and we feel it important to take our music out to other churches whenever possible, and to use itto teach, to nurture and to evangelise. To this end the PCC has agreed to fund the purchase of a Yamaha keyboard, which can be used at Gt. Casterton but also taken out to the churches which currently have no playable instrument, and indeed to other venues where the choir will perform. We have had a very generous donation towards the cost, and the promise of further smaller donations, but we still need more. So – if you value our music, could you make a contribution towards this? Please give anything you can spare to either John Horobin or to me.

August sees the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of WW1, and on Sunday 10th we will have special services to mark this. On Saturday 9th we have an evening of music and readings from that era in Great Casterton Church Hall, and I hope to see many of you there for what promises to be a very good evening.

And finally…. Thanks to John Horobin for sending me a quotation from Gustav Mahler, which John heard on Radio 4 a week or so back, and which really sums up what I hope we are doing in terms of Mission

"Tradition is the handing down of the flame, not the worship of ashes"

With best wishes

Jo

OTHER SERVICES WITHIN THE GROUP

SUNDAY

9.00
(9.15 at TINWELL)

10.3O

OTHER

FIRST

HC TINWELL

HC LT CASTERTON

HC GT CASTERTON

SECOND

HC OR MP TICKENCOTE APRIL,MAY, JUNE JULY ONLY PLUS REMEMBRANCE AND CAROL SERVICE

FAMILY SERVICE
GT CASTERTON

TINWELL FAMILY SERVICE 4.00 from June 2014

THIRD

HC LT CASTERTON

HC GT CASTERTON

TINWELL EVENSONG 3.00 WINTER 4.00 SUMMER

FOURTH

HC PICKWORTH
HC TINWELL

HC GT CASTERTON AND SUNDAY SCHOOL

FIFTH

BENEFICE HC IN ONE OF OUR FIVE CHURCHES - SEE NOTICE BOARDS FOR DETAILS EACH TIME

The Parish Church stands in what in Roman times was a protected zone between the ramparts and ditch on the N.and E.and the river on the S. and W. The church stands on the site of a Roman temple, on which an early Christian church was built; this was probably a wooden structure, but of it no trace remains.

The wooden structure was replaced by a Saxon church consisting of a small Chancel and an archless Nave. Saxon long and short work is still in evidence in the S.E. corner of the nave.

The Norman church consisted of a nave and two small aisles divided from the Nave by round, arched arcades resting on columns of stone with square bases. The nave was low with a flat wooden roof. The tower opened into the nave through a fine horseshoe arch. At the E. end was a wall pierced with a low round arch leading into a small oblong chancel, against the East end of which was the altar.

In the 13th Century an Early English chancel with lancet windows was built, while the round arch between the nave and chancel was raised to a point. Other changes followed: the aisles were lighted with windows with decorated tracery, and carried on their walls in rough distemper the story of the Incarnation. Above the Norman arcade was added a clerestory with decorated windows surmounted by an open roof of massive oak timbers. Across the chancel arch stretched a wooden loft carrying figures of Our Lord on the Cross with St Mary and St John on either side.

In the 15th century a clerestory was added. The font on a chamfered plinth may be late 12th/early 13th century.

The Reformation saw the destruction of many of the church's treasures.

In the 18th century the church was fitted with box pews of deal.

Considerable restoration work was carried out in the mid to late 20th century.