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UK Local Councils

Great Casterton Parish Council

Serving the people of Great Casterton

Clerk: Derek Patience
29 Priory Gardens, Stamford, PE9 2EG

Tel: 01780 753066

The Church of St Peter & St Paul

St. Peter and St. Paul, Great Casterton is one of the five churches in the group comprising Great Casterton, Little Casterton, Pickworth, Tickencote and Tinwell.

PRIEST-IN-CHARGE The Rev. Jo Saunders 01780 480479 / 07946237223 Email revjosaunders@live.co.uk

HONORARY ASSISTANT PRIEST The Rev Bob Mackrill 01780 763788 / 0775365051 Email bobmackrill@btinternet.com

Our Sunday Service is at 10.30, and is Holy Communion on the 1st, 3rd and 4th Sunday Sunday School meets in the Hall on 4th Sunday). We have an informal Family Service on the 2nd Sunday. Visitors are always welcome, and we have a toy corner for small children.

Baptisms are held at this service, but may also be arranged at other times.

Weddings by arrangement.

Anyone living in, or with a connection to, Great Casterton which includes Rutland Heights has the legal right to marry there. Anyone living in, or with a connection to, the other churches has the right to marry there

We have a coffee morning in the hall every Wednesday in term time from 10.30 and warmly welcome visitors

Sunday School is held on the 4th Sunday of each month at 10.15 in the church hall for children up to the age of 11. Parents and carers are welcome to stay with small children. The children join the congregation in church for the last part of the service.

Our Toddler Group meets in the hall every Friday in term time from 10.00 and we welcome all toddlers and their carers

Gt. Casterton Church Hall is available for lettings. Contact Steve Suffling 01780 751384

The Casterton Singers form the church choir, but also give concerts. New members are very welcome. Contact Jill Bush 01780 767270 or Marion Horobin 01780 755523

Details of all services in the group can be found below.
NB: Large print copies of Service Sheets are available and we have excellent wheelchair access

REV JO'S LETTER FOR APRIL 2014

If you've been in Gt Casterton church during Lent, you will have noticed a large cross standing on the chancel step. If you've looked closely, you'll see that it is actually the remains of our Christmas tree, and it stands as a reminder that Christmas is the beginning of the story of our salvation.

In the Old Testament we read about Adam and Eve bringing sin into the world, the great flood, from which only Noah and his family were saved, the story of the Patriarchs, the wandering in the wilderness of the people of Israel led by Moses, the Exodus, and finally the entry of the children of Israel into the Promised Land. So many times God tried to redeem his people, but over and over again they were disobedient and broke their covenant with him. In the New Testament we learn of the New Covenant – how God sent Jesus into the world to redeem it, and that is what we celebrate at Easter – it's the triumphant climax of that story of our salvation.

So the cross stands in church during Lent as a powerful symbol to remind us that it was our sin that sent Jesus to the cross. On Easter day it, like us, will be transformed into Easter joy… make sure you come and take a look!

Our journey through Lent continues. Some of us will have stuck resolutely to our Lenten discipline, others will have fallen away, but however successful we have been, we have all had a reminder of the need for that spiritual discipline.

On Pal Sunday, April 13th, we have our annual visit at Gt Casterton from the student pilgrims as they walk with a cross to Walsingham in Norfolk. They will stop for an act of worship in the church at about 3.00, have tea in the hall and then walk to Stamford where they will spend the night before setting off to reach Walsingham on Good Friday. If you could provide a cake for them, please let Sue Cliffe or Karen Norton know – and you'd be more than welcome to come and serve the teas on the day.

On Easter Eve, April 19th, Benjamin Baker and Jessica Hardiment will be married at Little Casterton, where Jessica's parents were married in 1982. As the church will be decorated for Easter, it should provide a lovely setting for their wedding.

Skyla-Rae Mears was baptised at Gt Casterton on March 23rd, and we welcome her into the community of faith.

As I write this, our first Family Service at Tinwell is about to take place, appropriately enough on Mothering Sunday. At 4.00. This is in response to several requests, so I hope it will be well supported and the start of a new phase in the life of Tinwell church.

Also at Tinwell we have had some work done on the bells and bell frame in the hope that we may be able to start ringing there again. The diocese and local ringers have pledged support in training ringers of any age, so watch out for an announcement in coming months. Bell ringing is a wonderful social activity, good exercise and above all, great fun.

Our annual Passover Supper will take place in Gt Casterton church (as the hall is booked for another event) at 7.00 on Maundy Thursday, April 17th. We will have a variety of soups and traybakes in place of our usual rather more substantial fare, but it should still be a very enjoyable and moving occasion. Please bring your own alcohol if you want it. Places are limited, so book early.

On Good Friday, 18th. There will be a short service of meditation at 3.00 at Gt Casterton.

Easter Day is April 20th, and services are listed at the back of this newsletter. The PCC at Gt Casterton discussed arrangements for Christmas and Easter, and decided that having Communion after a Family Service did not work well, so instead we are trying an all-age Communion at Easter. This is designed to be child-friendly, and fairly short. (At Christmas it was decided to have a Family Service only, as there is a Communion at Lt Casterton for those who wish to attend.) We will review both changes next year.

I wish you all a very happy Easter with the words of Edmund Spenser, a C16th poet.

Most glorious Lord of life, that on this day,

Didst make thy triumph over death and sin:

And having harrow'd hell, didst bring away

Captivity thence captive, us to win:

This joyous day, dear Lord, with joy begin,

And grant that we for whom thou diddest die,

Being with thy dear blood clean wash'd from sin,

May live for ever in felicity.

And that thy love we weighing worthily,

May likewise love thee for the same again:

And for thy sake, that all like dear didst buy,

With love may one another entertain.

So let us love, dear love, like as we ought,

Love is the lesson which the Lord us taught.

With best wishes

Jo

OTHER SERVICES WITHIN THE GROUP

SUNDAY

9.00
(9.15 at TINWELL)

10.3O

OTHER

FIRST

HC TINWELL

HC LT CASTERTON

HC GT CASTERTON

SECOND

HC OR MP TICKENCOTE APRIL,MAY, JUNE JULY ONLY PLUS REMEMBRANCE AND CAROL SERVICE

FAMILY SERVICE
GT CASTERTON

TINWELL EVENSONG
4.00 summer 3.00 Winter

THIRD

MORNING PRAYER
TINWELL
HC LT CASTERTON

HC GT CASTERTON

FOURTH

HC PICKWORTH
HC TINWELL

HC GT CASTERTON AND SUNDAY SCHOOL

FIFTH

BENEFICE HC IN ONE OF OUR FIVE CHURCHES - SEE NOTICE BOARDS FOR DETAILS EACH TIME

The Parish Church stands in what in Roman times was a protected zone between the ramparts and ditch on the N.and E.and the river on the S. and W. The church stands on the site of a Roman temple, on which an early Christian church was built; this was probably a wooden structure, but of it no trace remains.

The wooden structure was replaced by a Saxon church consisting of a small Chancel and an archless Nave. Saxon long and short work is still in evidence in the S.E. corner of the nave.

The Norman church consisted of a nave and two small aisles divided from the Nave by round, arched arcades resting on columns of stone with square bases. The nave was low with a flat wooden roof. The tower opened into the nave through a fine horseshoe arch. At the E. end was a wall pierced with a low round arch leading into a small oblong chancel, against the East end of which was the altar.

In the 13th Century an Early English chancel with lancet windows was built, while the round arch between the nave and chancel was raised to a point. Other changes followed: the aisles were lighted with windows with decorated tracery, and carried on their walls in rough distemper the story of the Incarnation. Above the Norman arcade was added a clerestory with decorated windows surmounted by an open roof of massive oak timbers. Across the chancel arch stretched a wooden loft carrying figures of Our Lord on the Cross with St Mary and St John on either side.

In the 15th century a clerestory was added. The font on a chamfered plinth may be late 12th/early 13th century.

The Reformation saw the destruction of many of the church's treasures.

In the 18th century the church was fitted with box pews of deal.

Considerable restoration work was carried out in the mid to late 20th century.